Can an 11-Year-Old Really Change How Lead in Water is Identified? 

Posted by: Rhona Reid On November 14, 2017 7:00 am

America’s water system is undeniably in crisis.  The projected cost of fixing the miles of pipeline that criss-cross the country runs to $1 trillion, according to some estimates.  There’s no quick fix.

Our infrastructure won’t be updated any time soon…
Next Generation – New Hope

But where there is a future, there is always hope.  And where there is hope, there is a future.  Maybe the next generation will come up with some answers, determined to put right what is broken and unsustainable.  This possibility has been highlighted by eleven-year-old Gitanjali Rao, winner of America’s top young scientist award.

Mythical Inspiration

Horrified by the news of lead contamination in the water of Flint, Michigan, Gitanjali quickly realized the issue …

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Cheap Water Ionizers – An Inside Look

Posted by: Rhona Reid On May 31, 2016 9:00 am

 
There’s a British saying (and incidentally the title of a 2004 album by band The Streets), “a grand don’t come for free.”  In other words, you don’t get something for nothing.  Or in other words, you get what you pay for.

Did you just accidentally order some lead exposure?
Did you just accidentally order some lead exposure?

Consumers wield a lot of power these days.  We don’t have to believe what a company tells us, when we can just click online and check the facts for ourselves.  So when we come across a deal that seems too good to be true, you know that it almost certainly is.

Cheap But Not Cheerful

Water ionizers aren’t cheap, nor should they be.  But the fact that they are a …

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Is Bruni the Next Flint? The Town in Texas with Arsenic in the Water.

Posted by: Rhona Reid On April 12, 2016 9:00 am

 
The residents of Bruni, less than 50 miles east of the Mexican border, know exactly how the people of Flint, Michigan feel.

Would you let your child drink this?
Would you let your child drink this?

Another Flint?

Flint, of course, is infamous for the town’s water supply becoming toxic with dangerously high levels of lead.  Bruni’s horror?  Turn on a tap and rife in the cloudy, unappetizing water is arsenic.  Linked to increased risk of developmental and intellectual issues in children, cancer and lung problems; in 2001, the EPA decided that the acceptable level of arsenic in drinking water should be lowered from 50 ppb (parts per billion) to 10 pbb.

This is the root cause of the controversy in Bruni.  During 2014 – 2015,  …

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