Bottled Water – The Biggest Con of All?  Part II

Posted by: Rhona Reid On March 15, 2018 12:00 pm

So, we’ve laid bare the extortionate cost of bottled water and highlighted the practice of selling tap water in bottles at a hugely inflated profit.  Persuading people to buy filtered tap water in a bottle with a slick label is quite a coup for the drinks industry.  

Ingredients: Tap Water
BPA is Here to Stay?

But it’s not just the ever-rising cost to both your pocket and to the environment.  Bottled water is problematic in other ways as well.

“Certain chemicals found in plastic bottles can have effects on every system in our bodies.  They can affect ovulation, and increase our risk of hormonally driven problems like PCOS, endometriosis and breast cancer, among other things.”

~ Dr Marilyn

Read More

Bottled Water – The Biggest Con of Them All?  

Posted by: Rhona Reid On March 13, 2018 7:00 am

The PR job is a good one, to be fair.  When it comes to bottled water, people are prepared to throw a lot of money at it, regardless of the environmental price and the sky-high cost to their pocket.  

Tap Water: Now Available in Bottles
Water Cheek

Bottled water costs more than tap water.  A lot more.  In fact, a new report from The National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) found that some people are paying an astonishing 10,000 times more per gallon for bottled water than they are for the water that comes out of the tap.

But here’s the next shocker: frequently the water that you buy in a bottle is…erm…tap water.  

“We don’t believe that consumers are

Read More

America Brings Home Report Card; Gets a D

Posted by: Rhona Reid On March 1, 2018 12:00 pm

America’s Water Infrastructure Report Card for 2017 is in and it’s fair to say that there’s room for improvement. It’s not exactly new news to talk about the state of America’s pipelines and how millions of Americans are drinking water that might be harmful to their health, but the report card highlights another aspect of the problem – the waste.

Must try harder?
Pipe Down

Many pipes were laid during the early-mid 20th century and have a lifespan of 75100 years.  There are an estimated 240,000 pipeline fractures every year and with an average annual repair rate of 0.5%, the repairs will take around 200 years to complete, by which time the pipelines will have been around

Read More

The Great American Water Taste Test!

Posted by: Rhona Reid On February 22, 2018 12:00 pm

In early February, the 18th annual Great American Water Taste Test took place at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.  

After days of testing, judges finally found some clean tap water in America.

Over two days, water samples from around the country were blind-tasted by a panel of judges, tasked with finding a winner.  What are they looking for?  Taste, smell and clarity are the watchwords according to The National Rural Water Association, the main sponsor of the event.

Water Good Winner!

After some serious sipping, the gold medal was awarded to Arcadia Water Utility of Wisconsin, which beat off some stiff competition from the City of Salisbury, MD Paleo Water and the Southeast Water Users District,

Read More

Plastics – The Global Crisis That Won’t Go Away

Posted by: Rhona Reid On February 15, 2018 12:00 pm

Single use plastics take five minutes to produce, five minutes to use and 500 years to break down, the vice-president of the European Commission, Frans Timmermans, told reporters recently.  

499 years to go.

In a move that highlights just how catastrophic the risk of choking the planet in plastic really is, the EU has announced a plan to ensure that by 2030, all packaging on the continent must be reusable or recyclable.

No More Plastic Imports to China

The move is partly in response to China announcing that it will no longer accept plastic waste imports.  For years, EU countries have met their own higher recycling targets and reduced landfill by shipping the excess to China.  Here, the large-scale

Read More

Water, Water Everywhere…

Posted by: Rhona Reid On February 7, 2018 12:00 pm

It sounds obvious, but water is everywhere at the moment.  From Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water cleaning up during awards season; the reckless craze for so-called “Raw Water”; the fact that South Africa’s Cape Town is about to reach Day Zero when the water runs out, and closer to home, that America’s own water supply is barely out of the news these days.  

Water is making headlines every day.
What Do We Want From Water?

Water is big news.  Of course it is, it’s a massive part of our lives.  We depend on it for life itself and yet we’re all guilty of wasting it from time to time.  So how did we become so complacent

Read More

Why Reverse Osmosis Is NOT the Answer to Chromium-6

Posted by: Rhona Reid On February 6, 2018 7:00 am

The cancer-causing contaminant Chromium-6, brought to the public gaze by Erin Brockovich, is at levels exceeding public health goals in 50 states.

Chromium-6 – Here to Stay?

Millions of people are trying to find a workable solution to protect themselves and their families and to avoid drinking contaminated water.  

What Reverse Osmosis Water Does to the Pipeline

A reverse osmosis water system is sometimes touted as a possible solution on both a domestic and municipal level.  After all, it removes contaminants and that’s the goal, right?

Unfortunately, reverse osmosis is not a solution on either front.  On a city-wide basis, aside from the prohibitive cost of building the plant, the stripped-back water – though admittedly free of contaminants

Read More

Half of All Americans Have Radiation in Their Water

Posted by: Rhona Reid On February 1, 2018 12:00 pm

According to this report published in January by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), 173 million people – around half of all Americans – have been exposed to radiation in their drinking water.  That means an increase in the possibility of developing certain types of cancer and can also have a detrimental effect on fetal development.  

Radioactive elements enter our groundwater…and stay there.
The “Erin Brockovich” Chemical

By studying 50,000 water systems countrywide, the EWG found that millions of people across 50 states are drinking water that contains radioactive contaminants; including the most commonly-occurring radioactive element, radium.

In Texas – one of the worst affected states – up to 80% of homes are supplied with water containing potentially dangerous levels

Read More

The Environmentally Friendly Odd Couple?

Posted by: Rhona Reid On January 30, 2018 7:00 am

Back in November last year we talked about America Recycles Day, a great cause supported by Keep America Beautiful.

We all need to do more of this.

Now, it’s easy to think about the bottled water industry being right at the other end of any “Earth-friendly” scale, but some recent news is heartening and perhaps surprising.  

Planet-Friendly Partnership

On January 17, at the 2018 Keep America Beautiful National Conference, the International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) announced that it would be sponsoring the Keep America Beautiful initiative. 

“We stand committed to helping Americans better understand recycling and its potential for economic, environmental and community benefits by working with all stakeholders—manufacturers; the waste management industry; government entities; other nonprofit

Read More

Sandbranch: The Town Without Water

Posted by: Rhona Reid On December 7, 2017 12:00 pm

There has never been running water here.  Some of the dwindling number of residents, all of whom live in poverty, recall that there were wells up until around 30 years ago, where locals could draw water. Those wells are now dry or contaminated.  People who live here have to make a seven-mile journey to buy water or depend on donations made to the local Baptist church.

Welcome to Sandbranch, just 14 miles southeast of Dallas, the fifth wealthiest city in America.  

Welcome to Sandbranch.
Forgotten Community?

There hasn’t been any investment here for a long time.  The community doesn’t have trash collections, proper sewerage or street lighting – yet most of the residents don’t want move, or lack

Read More